A New Robin

Robin Egg Shell

Two weeks of warm, squashy, beating-heart silence,
trapped in an ever-shrinking space, unable to stand or stretch,
until finally I figure out what that egg tooth is for,
peck-peck-pecking until CRACK, the light pours in,
the blue sky winks through veiling green leaves,  Continue reading

A Book by the Brook — Meet My Family!

Finds tongues in trees, books in running brooks,
Sermons in stones, and good in everything.

— William Shakespeare

A Book by the Brook: Book Reviews at FriendlyFairyTales.com

Meet my Family! has adorable baby animals comparing notes on families. A raccoon kit grows up with a single-mom but a titi monkey hangs out with his dad. Swans have both parents and sea turtles have none. Laysan albatross chicks have two moms and chinstrap penguin chicks have two dads. Any kind of family unit you can imagine is normal to someone. Laura Purdie Salas wrote each animal baby a poem, and Stephanie Fizer Coleman brought them to life with her art.  Continue reading

Dinosaur Dawn

Canadian Kestrel

Used by Permission of Cindy Knoke

Baby Oriole

Used by Permission of Cindy Knoke

Hummingbird with pink cheek

Used by Permission of Cindy Knoke

When dinosaurs greeted the dawn,
perhaps they tweeted and twittered,
while they preened and flirted,
just as their modern descendants
greet the dawn with a chorus that
rattles shutters and billows curtains. Continue reading

Juniper Jewels

Blue Juniper berries

Jewel-bright juniper berries
dangled like azure fairies
amidst needles unfurled,
seeking the eyes of every bird.
Berries stayed sugar sweet
until fermenting was complete.
Early spring, greedy bluejays
fell down tipsy over two days,
leaving feathers ruffled aft.
How the crows laughed.

Copyright 2016 Brenda Davis Harsham

Note: Some birds actually eat too many fermented berries and behave badly. Once I discovered that, I just had to write a poem about it. I also ran across a hilarious video of African animals overindulging on Marula fruit. A more serious poem about juniper berries is here. Have a great week!

Berries Dry

Red berries

Birds feed
on berry seed
red feather
autumn weather
no rain
summer’s gain
hot day
children play
rain hat
turkeys fat
eat weeds
swollen seeds
rain late
streams in spate
school’s out
puddles: shout

Copyright 2015 Brenda Davis Harsham

Note: No matter what the weather, the birds eat and the kids play. Flocks of turkeys roam the neighborhood, pecking and munching. They’re as tall as my children and unafraid of anything but dogs!

Fairy Tent City

Mushrooms

A sudden squall thunders.
Tent City springs up.
Way-sprites huddle –
wayfaring fae kin
dislike staying home.
They travel light:
just dancing feet,
a bit of music
and nature’s magic.
When rain pounds,
they hold fast
to one slippery slope and
conical roofs rise,
followed soon by tunes.
Fiddles sigh and drums thrum.
A lilting song climbs the scale –
a spirited counterpoint
to the pattering rain.
Birds hide under leaves
and bob their heads.
Chipmunks curl up
in their beds.
If only the music
would never stop.

Copyright 2015 Brenda Davis Harsham

River Drifting

Water Lily

River blooms green
Between water lily stars.
Swans nibble
Tender water moss
While minnows
Dart amid the bobbing
Carpet of green.
Water striders flee.
A hush falls as
The great blue heron
Lifts its wide wings.
He beats the air from his
Driftwood perch.
A redwinged blackbird
Flashes red and yellow stripes
Among the elderberries.
Mrs. Mallard pecks at
Arrow Arum.
A Canada goose stands
On one foot in the shallows.
The current carries us
Ever onward
Toward the sea,
The light in our eyes.

Copyright 2015 Brenda Davis Harsham

Water Lily and lily pads

 

Note: I’ve been boating with the kids for three days straight. They took to stand-up paddle boarding. They might never canoe again.

Spring Rain Crescendo

Purple Irises in Rain

Raindrops
Rain plops
Plink, plink
Pitter, patter
Crack of thunder
Howling gusts
Shake the windows
Rain drums sideways
Young plants flatten
Trees bend sideways
Dry earth drinks deep
Lemon tulip petals scatter
Blacktop steams and hisses
Pollen washes into soil
Puddles swell to lakes
Wind softens, sighs
Drip, drop, stop
Greens deepen
Flowers glisten
Birds sing
I listen

Copyright 2015 Brenda Davis Harsham

Note: We are having a dry spring, and we need rain. If we don’t get rain soon, we might be dancing for it like the children in the fairy tale, Rain Dance. This poem is a prayer for rain and a celebration of Poetry Friday, where poetry falls like rain on a dry earth. The host and poetry gathering point this week is Random Noodling. The hostess, Diane, offers a quote by Mark Twain and a poem about sanity. Worth a look! Write a poem for kids or quote one by another, and you can join the fun by visiting and contributing your link. Here is a bonus poem by a favorite author:

April Rain

Let the rain kiss you
Let the rain beat upon your head with silver liquid drops
Let the rain sing you a lullaby
The rain makes still pools on the sidewalk
The rain makes running pools in the gutter
The rain plays a little sleep song on our roof at night
And I love the rain. 

Langston Hughes